Motivation and Communication

Motivation and Communication: Being a Great Supervisor

Creating motivation and communication that enables your people will decidedly make you a better supervisor, manager, or leader. When you can communicate team and personal goals the right way, employees will buy-in to your vision, and feel motivated to succeed. Be inspired by the vision you champion and learn some methods to boost employee motivators easily. A great supervisor needs to listen and trust their people, be open with their motivation and communication that is congruent with each person.

In part two of this series of 37 questions, you’ll get another 12 questions that you need to answer to see if you understand how motivation and communication are the best tools to show your authenticity to others, who can then buy-in to the vision that you champion as a great supervisor.

  1. Is Herzberg’s research still relevant to management in the 21st century?
  • Sometimes people think that because Herzberg’s research was conducted in 1968, its relevance in the 21st century is limited.
  • In fact, that is not true.  Harvard Business Review conducted and compiled follow-up research to revalidate Herzberg’s findings, and in February 2003, republished Herzberg’s work with virtually no changes.
  • So in fact, Herzberg’s research is very relevant in the 21st century.
  1. How can your knowledge of intrinsic factors help you in your role as a supervisor?
  • Most supervisors would agree that of the top six intrinsic factors, at least four are under the direct control of the supervisor, and the remaining two can be strongly influenced by the supervisor.
  • Thus, the supervisor has the ability to significantly boost motivators in the workplace, and therefore create job satisfaction for employees.
  1. How can your knowledge of extrinsic factors help you in your role as a supervisor?
  • Most supervisors would agree that of the top seven extrinsic factors, at least three are under the direct control of the supervisor, and the remaining five can be strongly influenced by the supervisor.
  • Thus, the supervisor has the ability to significantly remove de-motivators in the workplace, and therefore remove dissatisfaction for employees.
  1. What are some practical ways that you can boost motivators?
  • Of course the opportunities are endless, but here are a few ideas.
  • Create a sense of purpose – help your people see how what they do fits into the big picture.
  • Offer genuine and sincere praise
  • Give them opportunities to take on greater responsibility
  • Give them opportunities to participate in new initiatives and learn new things.
  • Say thank you.
  • Give them time off, token gifts, public and private recognition.
  1. What are some practical ways that you can remove de-motivators?
  • The opportunities are endless, but here are a few ideas.
  • In situations of perceived bureaucracy, take time to explain why it exists.
  • Buffer your employees from some of the bureaucracy that comes from above.
  • Learn to be a better supervisor
  • Create a positive team environment
  • Offer flexibility in working hours
  • Offer creativity in work space
  1. Will boosting intrinsic factors be successful if there are many extrinsic factors present?
  • Unfortunately, if there are many extrinsic factors present, boosting intrinsic factors can have zero to little impact.
  • Think of it this way: if people are dissatisfied, they need to get to “no dissatisfaction” before they can get to “satisfaction”.
  • If staff is de-motivated, your best efforts in motivation will be in focusing on removing the de-motivators that you can.
  • For example, if staff is demoralized because they have recently been made to take a pay cut, recognition for achievement will have little impact.  Instead, you will have more success if you look for ways to buffer them from some of the bureaucracy.
  1. How can self-esteem be a factor in motivating employees?
  • Self-esteem can be both an extrinsic factor and an intrinsic factor
  • Good supervisors (an extrinsic factor) recognize the importance of making investments (or refueling) their employees.  When you build up your employees’ self-esteem and self-confidence, you are being a better supervisor, and you can impact the dissatisfaction/no dissatisfaction continuum.
  • Recognition for achievement is an intrinsic factor, and when you recognize employees for their good work, you build up their self-esteem and self-confidence.  Thus, you can impact the no satisfaction/satisfaction continuum.
  • Thus, focusing on building self-esteem and self-confidence in your employees is a double-bonus approach to motivation.
  1. What can you do to build up an employee’s self-esteem?
  • Again, there are many opportunities, but here are few ideas.
  • Invest time in them – teaching, talking, learning more about them.
  • Expect big things
  • Solicit their input and listen to them
  • Get to know them personally
  • Invest resources in them – training, etc.
  1. What are the five characteristics of rewards that make them successful as employee motivators?
  • Tailor the reward to the employee.
  • Be clear about the performance you desire.
  • Make sure the performance level is attainable.
  • Clearly link rewards to performance.
  • Consider what might make the reward less effective, so that you can prevent it from happening.
  1. Why is it important to tailor the reward to the employee?
  • Because employees are different in their needs, desires and goals, there is no such thing as “one size fits all” when it comes to finding the right rewards to motivate an individual employee.
  • It’s important for a supervisor to find out what makes a specific employee “tick” and then to tailor appropriate rewards to that employee.
  • Determine the rewards valued by each employee.
  • Observe employee reactions.
  • Ask them what they desire.
  1. What does it mean to be clear about the performance you desire?
  • People have to understand what your expectations are of them.
  • If you do not make your expectations clear, then you cannot hold an employee accountable to action.
  1. What can you do to ensure that a performance level is attainable for an employee?
  • If you make the performance level beyond the capability of an employee, you will actually only succeed in de-motivating them.
  • You want to get the employee to “stretch” towards targets, but you don’t want the target to be unattainable.
  • Learn more about your employees so that you understand their strengths and capabilities.
  • Consult with the employee to jointly set expectations, goals, and targets.

Stay tuned for our last follow up article where we’ll go into the final questions and answers that a great supervisor needs to know about motivation and communication that works.

Originally published on Merge Speaks

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